The world of British television off and on the screen, as it was sixty years ago.

Doubly Lucky

Those some distance away from London will be pleased to learn from The Times’ “News in Brief” section reports that the Independent Television Authority will begin high-power test transmissions from Croydon at 6pm on 13 September when the station will be formally opened by the Mayor of Croydon.

The Daily Express is more precise and notes that the weekday tests will normally run from 9.30am to 12.30pm, 2pm to 5.30pm and 7.30pm to 8.30pm on weekdays, and from 10am to 1pm on Saturdays.

It’s a shame they won’t be broadcasting any tests when working folk might be pottering about the television shops during their lunch-breaks, but you can’t have everything.

A Robery Furnival play about cricket forms the dramatic element of this evening’s BBC programmes. The Slackering Shield is set in a village in Yorkshire and the men’s only interest – to the women’s chagrin – is their village team’s performance in this year’s league competition. Jean Hamilton produces the drama which stars Leslie Dwyer, Harold Goodwin, Edward Cast, Pauline Loring and Billie Whitelaw.

Tonight’s Starlight from the National Radio Show, features Frances Day and her Four Knights and the earlier “Arenascope” production is a five-a-side football tournament with interval entertainment from the Dagenham Girl Pipers. Commentary, unsurprisingly, comes from Kenneth Wolstenholme.

The Stage’s TV Page reports that Tommy Trinder has been signed for two major shows on commercial television, both from Associated Broadcasting. As well as being the resident compere on Sunday Night at the London Palladium he will also be the master of ceremonies in a new audience participation game Beat the Clock which was created in America by the same team who invented What’s My Line?

The same company has gained three new production executives: Betty McEnnerie, Wally Peterson and Noele Gordon.

More from the TV Page soon.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.